SCMAGLEV Northeast Corridor

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G-Root Liska
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SCMAGLEV Northeast Corridor

Unread post by G-Root Liska »

So I've been just randomly reading news articles and found an interesting article from my daily google news stuff.

I didn't know there was an idea for a maglev in the northeast corridor between Baltimore and Washington D.C.

I guess I'm curious what others think and feel on this situation. They're is a 654 page document release by the DEIS. I didn't read it yet at all.

It would seem Amtrak feels this would cause problems for them and honestly I can see that.

I have to do more research in it and read that document. However, I really don't like the idea of maglev trains. Especially when I hear about greenhouse gasses and what no created by train locomotives which have proven time and time again to be more cleaner than a diesel truck and typical car. Plus is it really better for greenhouse gasses when you include a power plant that would have to make the power needed for a maglev train.

This was the article I read. https://wtop.com/dc-transit/2021/05/amt ... rain-line/

Also if this isn't supposed to be hear please move to proper part of the forum.

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DaveO
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Re: SCMAGLEV Northeast Corridor

Unread post by DaveO »

Diesel locomotive are cleaner only in the sense that they are capable of hauling more freight per horsepower compared to the number of trucks needed to replace a train.
Also, the article discussion is about moving people, not freight.
EDIT: The Northeast Corridor is electrified. Freights and some commuter trains excepted.

That same relative type of efficiency also applies to modern power generating plants which would be used to power a maglev train.
Since maglev trains needs to be fully separated that gives them a big advantage over the current rail lines.
Give the current rail line such fully separation and some of that advantage goes away.
Separation means more than at grade crossings.

G-Root Liska
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Re: SCMAGLEV Northeast Corridor

Unread post by G-Root Liska »

DaveO wrote:
Sat May 08, 2021 7:31 am
Diesel locomotive are cleaner only in the sense that they are capable of hauling more freight per horsepower compared to the number of trucks needed to replace a train.
Also, the article discussion is about moving people, not freight.
EDIT: The Northeast Corridor is electrified. Freights and some commuter trains excepted.

That same relative type of efficiency also applies to modern power generating plants which would be used to power a maglev train.
Since maglev trains needs to be fully separated that gives them a big advantage over the current rail lines.
Give the current rail line such fully separation and some of that advantage goes away.
Separation means more than at grade crossings.
Thanks for the information on that. Does give a better sense of meaning to MAGLEV.

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Tom49801
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Re: SCMAGLEV Northeast Corridor

Unread post by Tom49801 »

Having worked for Amtrak's Northeast Corridor for 30 years & living in the Wash DC / Baltimore area for many years, the MagLev idea was re-visited again just a few years ago after it's initial thoughts about 20 years prior. Back then, it was estimated to cost $800 million per mile & would only have stations in Wash DC & Baltimore. Estimated travel time was 22 minutes. What wasn't factored in & still isn't is the amount of driving time to get to either of these train stations - the traffic is unreal! The plan was to run the MagLev between the north & southbound lanes of the BW Parkway (I-295). All of Amtrak's NEC trains use fully electric propulsion locomotives (we call them "Motors", not engines).

However, there is an alternative using the same NEC tracks - the MARC (Maryland Rail Commuter Penn Line) trains that are funded by Maryland & have Amtrak crews. MARC uses diesel engines & there are about 8 of the HHP8 Motors still left. However, MARC wants an entirely diesel fleet because they also run their trains on CSX (The Camden Line). Also, there are no grade crossings on the NEC, we had phased them out years ago with joint Amtrak & State funding.

Both Amtrak & MARC offer discounted monthly passes for passengers commuting to/from work. For Wash DC to Baltimore, Amtrak's monthly pass is $300 for the MARC trains it's $216. Buying a regular 1 way ticket is $14 on Amtrak with a 42 minutes travel time. For a MARC ticket, it's $8 with a 1 hour & 3 minutes travel time (MARC makes station stops along the way).

The advantages with the MARC trains are: there are still stations having free parking & they run their Penn Line trains about every 1 hour to 1 hour 15 minutes apart from 6:10am till 10:55pm. Also, you're not limited to boarding only at Wash DC & Baltimore as you are with the Amtrak trains & the proposed MagLev.

An environmental advantage was mentioned in the article about the MagLev trains, well, they'll be getting their electrical power from the same commercial source as Amtrak does for its NEC (Amtrak takes the 60 Hz commercial power and converts it to 25 HZ for its centenary system via converter stations we had built). The diesel MARC engines are meeting better emissions standards & if it wasn't for the MARC CSX diesel engine "shared" requirements, the MARC Penn Line would still be using "motors".

I don't know what the proposed travel time is now for the MagLev, initially, it was 22 minutes, ticket cost is ?? Would it really be worth the cost for the MagLev vs Amtrak's $14 ticket / 32 minute ride or MARC's $8 / 1 hour 3 minutes ride?

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